Youth of Ashura

The Day of Ashura is the most significant religious ceremonial for Shiite Muslims.

The celebration of the Ashura consists in mourning for the death of Hussain, the Prophet Mohammad's grandson, killed after an heroic fighting to save his people from the tiranny. Hussain's martyrdom is widely interpreted by Shiite as a symbol of the fight against injustice and oppression.

Young generations of Iranians are the most passionate partecipants of the commemoration of the Hussain's martyrdom. Hussain is not just a Prophet, regardless of the religious belief, he is an hero and an example to follow for those claiming for justice and freedom. During the day of Ashura young Iranians become actors playing the story of Hussein.

Once a year they can take the streets screaming, dancing and fighting against the tiranny. The bounderies between play and reality is blurred. Sometimes these celebrations mark the begining for remonstrations against the government.

Because of this danger, some governments have banned the Ashura. In 1930s Reza Shah forbade it in Iran. The regime of Saddam Hussein saw this as a potential threat and banned it for many years. After more than 13 centuries, the memory of Hussain still warm up the blood of thousands of young Iranians. Celebrating the Ashura they say they are ready to die to fight for freedom and justice.